valadilenne: (Movies: Oh Wolf you are 100% hotness)
[personal profile] valadilenne
I watched it, and I can't help but think it would have ended so much better had Laurie gone off with Jud Fry instead of insipid, airheaded Curley.

There's an entire song about how all the townspeople will mourn Jud when he's "daid," but the ending of the whole movie involves him being quickly shoved out of sight, probably headfirst into an unmarked grave, so the clean and pretty people can have a sham murder trial and let the prom king and queen saunter off in their fringe-top surrey.

I really think it would have been a far more interesting exploration of the characters. He was just lonely and misunderstood, and he had more genuine feeling for Laurie than the guy who looks like he has to put his hair in rods every night before bed. Tormented anti-heroes are so much more fascinating than patented, squeaky-clean guys in white duds.

Also Scott Cohen (see icon) played a pedophile councilman on tonight's premiere of Criminal Intent. It was weird seeing him a decade after 10th Kingdom, but he's just as rakish and good-looking as ever. That's probably going to be the first thing I do after finals are over--sit down and watch that entire miniseries like it's 2001 again. Oh yes.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-04-21 02:30 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] saltintheoven.livejournal.com
I actually like Oklahoma. But the film of the play suffers a bit from the I-was-made-in-1955-disease. Both of the leads are pretty dull - I've seen other versions where the characters work a lot better.

I never thought Jud was a great villain - although, I think in the play itself, he actually tries to stab Curly, instead of just setting stuff on fire (lame?). And, to be fair, that song about everybody being sorry he's gone was never meant to be taken seriously. It's obviously a lie - one long veiled insult/piece of black humor on Curly's part.

I remember the 10th Kingdom. I liked it at the time - but the older I get, the more astonished (and delighted) I am that it exists. It's so cheesy I can't even believe it.

We need more cheese like that lately.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-04-21 05:35 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] smokingguncafe.livejournal.com
I agree that the film version is pretty cheesy, and I understand that the song is meant to stick a knife between his ribs without him ever realizing it. Maybe it's a little po-mo, but I would have ended things differently, like with a musical cue or leitmotif of "Poor Jud" when they come in and say he's dead. It ends too neatly--which was perfect for audiences back then, but his character is far too interesting to let go of that easily. I mean, they left out his big solo because it was "too dark." Sure, he's dangerous, but he doesn't flip out on Laurie when she purposely spooks the horses--he's actually calm and asks her why she did it, and then she just takes off. I guess it all depends on how different productions characterize him, but I sympathized with Rod Steiger more than I did with Gordon MacRae.

I hope The Great Race was the race of your dreams, and that Natalie Woods's hair will inspire you somehow. I'm into Shirley Jones's hair in Oklahoma right now.

(no subject)

Date: 2009-04-22 08:28 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] saltintheoven.livejournal.com
Man, I wish my hair would recurl itself after I go skinny-dipping. That would just make my life.

You know whose hair is epic though - Jane Seymour in the '82 version of The Scarlet Pimpernel. Omigosh.

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